The best of Geology and Earth Science on the web
Welcome to all-geo.org

LATEST FROM THE GEOBLOGOSPHERE:

Swedish tourist killed by avalanche in Jammu and Kashmir, India.

Sciency Thoughts | 18 January, 2018
A Swedish tourist has died after being caught in an avalanche on Mount Apharwat near Gulmarg in the Baramulla District of Jammu and Kashmir, India, on Thursday 18 January 2018. The skier is understood to have been one of two Swedish men caught in the event, the other of whom was rescued alive. 
Categories: Avalanche; Baramulla District; Himalayas; India; Jammu and Kashmir; Mount Apharwat; South Asia;

Improving Tropical Cyclone Risk Assessment

State of the Planet | 18 January, 2018
Chia-Ying Lee, a scientist at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society, studies the structure and intensity evolution of tropical cyclones and how these are influenced by climate change....
Categories: Climate; Earth Sciences; Natural Disasters; center for climate and life; extreme weather; hurricanes; International Research Institute for Climate and Society; tropical cyclones;

2017 Was Another Year of Amazing Heat. It’s not Natural, and It IS the Greenhouse Gases

NASA and NOAA both announced their global temperature results for 2017 today. NASA says it was the second warmest year on record and NOAA which does the analysis slightly differently came up with the 3rd hottest. Interestingly, if you remove the impa...
Categories: Uncategorized; Climate Change; featured; NASA; NOAA; Science;

A Hymn for Architecture that is Good for People and Neighborhoods, not Just Buildings

The Nature of Cities | 18 January, 2018
A review of Design for Good: A New Era of Architecture for Everyone by John Cary. 2017. 275 pages. ISBN 13: 978-1-61091-793-3 / ISBN 10: 1-61091-793-6. Island Press, Washington. Buy the book. We live in a consumer's world. Fed by products every second of our lives, urged to ponder, deliberate, and eventually consume that which is being sold to us. ... Continue reading A Hymn for Architecture that is Good for People and Neighborhoods, not Just Buildings '
Categories: People & Communities; Place & Design; Review; Africa; Architecture; Awareness; Communities; Design; Development; Education/Knowledge/Learning; Livability; Planning; Tools;

Opportunity: Going north across Perseverance Valley

Red Planet Report | 18 January, 2018
Sol 4970, January 16, 2018. The rover's Navcam looked back over its recent track on the slope of Perseverance Valley, and shot a composite that shows valley outcrops and even a bit of the next rim segment to the south ... Continue reading '...
Categories: Reports; Cape Byron; Endeavour Crater; Mars Exploration Rover; MER; NASA; Opportunity; Perseverance Valley;

Planetary Society CEO Bill Nye to Attend the State of the Union Address

Planetary Society Weblog | 18 January, 2018
When a congressman and current nominee for NASA Administrator asks you to be his guest at the state of the union address in Washington, D.C., how do you respond? For us, the answer was easy. Yes, Bill would be there....
Categories: None

HRSC: Crater named for Gerhard Neukum, Mars Express founder

Red Planet Report | 18 January, 2018
A fascinating martian crater has been chosen to honour the German physicist and planetary scientist, Gerhard Neukum, one of the founders of ESA's Mars Express mission. The International Astronomical Union named the 102 km-wide crater in the Noachis...
Categories: Reports; DLR; dunes; ESA; European Space Agency; FU Berlin; Gerhard Neukum; High Resolution Stereo Camera; HRSC; Mars Express; MEX; Neukum Crater; Noachis Terra;

Magnitude 5.9 Earthquake off the coast of Nicaragua and Cost Rica.

Sciency Thoughts | 18 January, 2018
The United States Geological Survey recorded a Magnitude  5.9 Earthquake at a depth of 30.6 km, about 25 km off the coast of San Juab del Sur in Rivas Department, Nicaragua, or 40 km off the Santa Rosa Peninsula in Guanacaste Province, Costa Rica, slightly after 9.00 am local time (slightly after 3.00 pm GMT) on Tuesday 16 January 2018. There are no reports of any damage or casualties associated with this event, though it was felt across southwestern Nicaragua and northwestern Costa Rica.
Categories: Caribbean Plate; Central America; Cocos Plate; Costa Rica; Earthquakes; Geohazards; Guanacaste Province; Middle American Trench; Nicaragua; Rivas Department; Subductive Plate Margin;

Northern Winds and Currents off North-East Greenland

Icy Seas | 18 January, 2018
I spent 6 weeks aboard the German research icebreaker R/V Polarstern last year leaving Tromso in Norway in early September and returned to Bremerhaven, Germany in October. We successfully recovered ocean sensors that we had deployed more than 3 years before. It felt good to see old friends, mates, and sensors back on the wooden deck. Many stories, some mysterious, some sad, some funny and happy could be told, but today I am working on some of the data as I reminisce.
Categories: Greenland; Ice Cover; Oceanography; Polarstern; sea ice; Arctic Ocean; continental shelves; glaciers; ice; moorings; oceanography; wind;

HiRISE: Small field of eroding dunes

Red Planet Report | 18 January, 2018
Small field of eroding dunes. Just drifting away into oblivion... Beautiful Mars series....
Categories: Reports; Beautiful Mars; dunes; Hesperia Planum; High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment; HiRISE; Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter; MRO; NASA; sand dunes; University of Arizona;

New, low-cost life detection instruments tested at Canadian Arctic Mars analog sites

Red Planet Report | 18 January, 2018
Researchers demonstrate for the first time the potential of existing technology to directly detect and characterize life on Mars and other planets. The study, published in Frontiers in Microbiology, used miniaturized scientific instruments and new mi...
Categories: Reports; life;

In Continuation of Trend, 2017 Was Second Warmest Year on Record

State of the Planet | 18 January, 2018
Earth's global surface temperatures in 2017 ranked as the second warmest since 1880, according to an analysis by NASA released today....
Categories: Climate; Press Release; climate change; Climate Science; Global Warming; Goddard Institute for Space Studies;

Earth Science Week in Pune, India

Earth Science Week last year took place all across the UK and Ireland - but is increasingly going global. In November, the NGO Jividha - meaning 'biodiversity' in Marathi - held a four day exhibition in association with Earth Science Week in Pune, India.
Categories: Education; Events; activities; communication; earth science week; education; environment; geology; hazards; india; outreach;

#tbt to that time New Mexico tried to demand a Gila River Compact

Inkstain (John Fleck) | 18 January, 2018
For today's #tbt (Throwback Thursday), a return to the remarkable era of Steve Reynolds in New Mexico water management, and that time Reynolds tried to give New Mexico an effective veto over the Central Arizona Project.
Categories: Arizona; Colorado River; New Mexico; water;

Getting started with spatial data in R – EdinbR talk

scottishsnow | 18 January, 2018
Last night (2018-01-17) I spoke at the EdinbR user group alongside Susan Johnston. Susan talked about writing R packages and you see her slides here. I gave an introduction to working with spatial data in R. You can see my slides below:
Categories: Computing; GIS; GRASS; open source; QGIS; R;

Preserving Urban Nature, No Silver Bullets

The Nature of Cities | 18 January, 2018
There is seldom a "silver bullet", single pathway to success when it comes to protecting urban greenspaces. Multiple strategies, often modified, sometimes abandoned, are typically the only way grassroots-based urban conservation efforts succeed in the face of bureaucratic resistance. Efforts to preserve and restore a 160-acre wetland in the Willamette River floodplain near downtown Portland, ... Continue reading Preserving Urban Nature, No Silver Bullets '
Categories: Art & Awareness; Essay; People & Communities; Place & Design; Art; Biodiversity; Biophilia; Communities; Conservation; Development; Ecosystem services; Education/Knowledge/Learning; Experiencing Nature; Governance; Landscape; Livability; North America; Participation/Democracy; Planning; Policy; Stewardship; Tools; Wetlands/Rivers/Streams; What is urban nature?;

Surviving AI, by Calum Chase

Mountain Beltway | 18 January, 2018
I know what you're thinking: another book about AI, Callan? Really?
Categories: AI; books;

The New Dinosaur Dictionary, Mark Hallett, and the best Christmas present ever

When I was nine, a copy of Don Glut's The New Dinosaur Dictionary turned up in my local Waldenbooks. It wasn't my first dinosaur book, by far - I'd been a dinosaurophile since the age of three. But The New Dinosaur Dictionary was different...
Categories: Art; brachiosaurids; credit where it's due; Dicraeosaurus; Hallett and Wedel sauropod book; life restorations; Mark Hallett; People we like; Saltasaurus; titanosaur;

The New Dinosaur Dictionary, Mark Hallett, and the best Christmas present ever

When I was nine, a copy of Don Glut's The New Dinosaur Dictionary turned up in my local Waldenbooks. It wasn't my first dinosaur book, by far - I'd been a dinosaurophile since the age of three. But The New Dinosaur Dictionary was different...
Categories: Art; brachiosaurids; credit where it's due; Dicraeosaurus; Hallett and Wedel sauropod book; life restorations; Mark Hallett; People we like; Saltasaurus; titanosaur;

Sheldon Walker and the non-existent “slowdown”

Open Mind | 18 January, 2018
Sheldon Walker has made yet another post at WUWT claiming there was a "slowdown" in global temperature recently, this time titled "Proof that the recent global warming slowdown is statistically significant (correcting for autocorrelation)." T...
Categories: climate change; Global Warming;

There's Always Something New to be Learned: Beavers on the Tuolumne River

Geotripper | 18 January, 2018
I will freely cop to the fact that I am not a particularly observant person. This is quite an admission for a guy who has been blogging for ten years about geology, the science that requires skills of observation almost like no other. Still, there it is. I lived in Stanislaus County for thirty years thinking that we have maybe twenty species of birds. In the last three years of finally paying attention to such things, I've learned that we have three hundred species, including those which utilize some of the most famous wintering grounds for migratory birds in the American West (if you want to learn more about this, check out my other blog Geotripper's California Birds)
Categories: California Golden Beaver; California Golden Beaver (Castor canadensis subauratus); North American Beaver; Tuolumne Parkway Trail; Tuolumne River;

Let's talk about NASA's latest commercial crew delay

Planetary Society Weblog | 18 January, 2018
SpaceX and Boeing might not be certified to carry astronauts to the International Space Station until 2019 or 2020....
Categories: None

Introducing Caihong juji

Letters from Gondwana | 17 January, 2018
Caihong juji holotype specimen (Hu, et al., 2018)
Categories: Uncategorized; birds; Caihong juji; China; Earth Sciences; Jurassic; paleontology; theropod; Yanliao Biota;

HiRISE: Fall in the Hellas Basin

Red Planet Report | 17 January, 2018
Fall in the Hellas Basin. We took this image during the Martian fall in the Southern Hemisphere, in the giant impact crater known as Hellas Basin where small boulders cast long shadows. The long shadows emphasize small scale topographic features. ......
Categories: Reports; Beautiful Mars; CO2 frost; Hellas Basin; High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment; HiRISE; Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter; MRO; NASA; University of Arizona; wind erosion;

Alseodaphnopsis ximengensis: A new species of Laurel from Yunnan Province, China.

Sciency Thoughts | 17 January, 2018
Laurels, Lauraceae, are evergreen Dicotyledonous Plants found in tropical and warm temperate zones around the world, though they are most diverse and abundant in Southeast Asia and tropical America, where they form an important component of tropical rainforests. Most Laurels are evergreen trees, though one genus, Cassytha, comprises parasitic vines. Laurels appeared some time in the Cretaceous, though opinions about how early vary. These plants are fruit-producers, typically relying on Birds to spread their seeds.
Categories: Biodiversity; Botany; China; Dicotylodons; Lauraceae; Laurels; Plants; Taxonomy; Tropical Forests; Ximeng County; Yunnan Province;

Latest: All of this has happened before, and all of this will happen again: an introduction to How the Earth Works

Latest: Unifying Theory of Geology Class

Latest: Volcanic ash layers in Svalbard hold clues to the formation of the North Atlantic

Latest: A refolded fold from Scotland



- The new timelapse timesink

- Are geologists mostly lefties?

All-geo.org